Results-Based Accountability™ Advice


 

2.21

How do we report on progress?



The Short Answer


Progress reports may address one or more of the following:

  • An actual turning of one or more curves: This is the most rare kind of event to report - when it is possible to see a change in direction away from the baseline.

  • An improvement in client results which contributes to turning the curve(s) - the effects of  a program, agency or service system on the well-being of clients or customers

  • An accomplishment - a task or set of tasks in the implementation plan that has been completed, 

  • An anecdote - a story of how a specific person's life actually got better. 

 

 

 



Full Answer


(1) There are four types of progress that can be reported:

  • An actual turning of one or more curves: This is the most rare kind of event to report - when it is possible to see a change in direction away from the baseline.

  • An improvement in client results which contributes to turning the curve(s): This is a report on the effects of  a program, agency or service system on the well-being of clients or customers, as a contribution to turning the curve on population well-being 

  • An accomplishment: This is a report on a task or set of tasks in the implementation plan that has been completed, like the opening of a family center or the issuance of an RFP. Or it may include some other achievement or event outside the implementation plan, like an award or recognition in the press.

  • An anecdote: A story of how a specific person's life actually got better. Do not underestimate the power or importance of this kind of reporting. For most audiences, this is the most "real" part of any report. It makes the connection back to how we experience well-being. It brings to life the meaning of data on progress. And it reminds us of why we are doing this work.


The attached progress report format was drafted for use by the Los Angeles County Task force on Self Sufficiency, but could be adapted for use by almost any population results effort.


(2) Public reporting of progress often involves making presentations to oversight bodies and may also involve press conferences from time to time. The attached prototype press conference was drafted for the UCLA Proposition 10 paper as a way to illustrate the kinds of progress that could be reported after a 5 or 10 year effort. This picture of what could be accomplished could also serve as a statement of ends, used to drive the results thinking process.


(3) An evaluation report is another kind of report on progress. These usually help answer questions about whether and to what extent individual programs or projects are working to affect client results for the better. Evaluation conclusions are often mixed, and presentations should go beyond a simple win/lose grading, to address the implications for choosing effective strategies to improve results for children and families.


The Web RAguide.org

 

 

1997 - 2010 by FPSI Mark Friedman
All Rights Reserved